ADOBE PHOTOSHOP CS6 DIGITAL CLASSROOM EBOOK

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Editorial Reviews. From the Back Cover. You have a personal tutor in the Digital Classroom. If you want expert instruction that fits into your schedule, theDigital. Read "Adobe Photoshop CS6 Digital Classroom" by Jennifer Smith available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first download. A complete . Read "Adobe Photoshop CS6 Digital Classroom" by Jennifer Smith available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first eBook. A complete.


Adobe Photoshop Cs6 Digital Classroom Ebook

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Selection from Adobe® Photoshop® CS6 Classroom in a Book®: The official training workbook from Adobe Thank you for downloading this digital version of: As an eBook reader, you have access to these files by following the steps below. Adobe® Photoshop® CS6 Digital Classroom riamemamohelp.ml riamemamohelp.ml i 5/8/12 AM5/8/12 AM riamemamohelp.ml Adobe®Photoshop® CS6DigitalClassroom Jennifer Smith and the AGI Creative Team riamemamohelp.ml Adobe® Photoshop® CS6 Digital.

The Color Settings Comment dialog box opens. Press OK again in the Color Settings dialog box to close it. You have saved your color settings so they can be accessed again in the future. A dialog box appears verifying that you want to delete the Adobe Photoshop settings file. The Color Settings dialog box appears. Press OK. Your color settings are restored. A note about color warnings Depending upon how your Color Settings are configured, there may be times when you will receive a Missing Profile or Embedded Profile Mismatch warning.

Understand that if you reset your preferences before each lesson without restoring your color settings you should not see these color warnings. This is because the default color setting of North America General Purpose 2 has all warning check boxes unchecked.

What is determined to be your working space is what you have assigned in the Color Settings dialog box. Mismatched color profile. This provides you access to lesson files and videos even if you misplaced your DVD. Checking for updated lesson files Make sure you have the most up-to-date lesson files and learn about any updates to your Photoshop CS6 Digital Classroom book by registering your book at www.

You may copy the entire lessons folder from the supplied DVD to your hard drive, or copy only the lesson folders for the individual lessons you wish to complete. For each lesson in the book, the files are referenced by the file name of each file.

The exact location of each file on your computer is not used, as you may have placed the files in a unique location on your hard drive. We suggest placing the lesson files in the My Documents folder Windows , or at the top level of your hard drive Mac OS , or on your desktop for easy access. Do one of the following: Open the pslessons folder on the supplied DVD, select the lesson you wish to complete, and drag the folder s to the pslessons folder you created on your hard drive.

Unlocking Mac OS files Macintosh users may need to unlock the files after they are copied from the accompanying disc.

If you are a Mac OS user and have difficulty saving over the existing files in this book, you can use these instructions so that you can update the lesson files as you work on them and also add new files to the lessons folder Note that you only need to follow these instructions if you are unable to save over the existing lesson files, or if you are unable to save files into the lesson folder.

Working with the video tutorials Your Photoshop CS6 Digital Classroom DVD comes with video tutorials developed by the authors to help you understand the concepts explored in each lesson. Each tutorial is approximately five minutes long and demonstrates and explains the concepts and features covered in the lesson.

The videos are designed to supplement your understanding of the material in the chapter. We have selected exercises and examples that we feel will be most useful to you. You may want to view the entire video for each lesson before you begin that lesson.

Additionally, at certain points in a lesson, you will encounter the DVD icon. Setting up for viewing the video tutorials The DVD included with this book includes video tutorials for each lesson. Copying the video tutorials to your hard drive: Note that the extension on both platforms may not always be visible.

Projector files allow the Flash content to be deployed on your system without the need for a browser or prior stand-alone player installation. Playing the video tutorials: Playing the videos directly from the DVD may result in poor quality playback. The Flash Player has a simple user interface that allows you to control the viewing experience, including stopping, pausing, playing, and restarting the video. You can also rewind or fast-forward, and adjust the playback volume.

Go to beginning. Volume control. Playback volume is also affected by the settings in your operating system. Be certain to adjust the sound volume for your computer, in addition to the sound controls in the Player window. Additional resources The Digital Classroom series goes beyond the training books. You can continue your learning online, with training videos, at seminars and conferences, and in-person training events.

Training from the Authors The authors are available for professional development training workshops for schools and companies. They also teach classes at American Graphics Institute, including training classes and online workshops. Visit agitraining. Book series Expand your knowledge of creative software applications with the Digital Classroom training series. Books are available for most creative software applications as well as web design and development tools and technologies.

Learn more at DigitalClassroom. Learn more at agitraining. Resources for educators Visit digitalclassroombooks. Starting up Before starting, make sure that your tools and panels are consistent by resetting your preferences.

Users of all levels can follow this step-by-step exercise of new features in Photoshop CS6. Register your book at www. You will work with several files from the ps01lessons folder in this lesson.

Make sure that you have loaded the pslessons folder onto your hard drive from the supplied DVD. See Lesson 1 in action!

Use the accompanying video to gain a better understanding of how to use some of the features shown in this lesson. You can find the video tutorial for this lesson on the included DVD.

You will use Adobe Bridge to locate your images for this lesson. Adobe Bridge also helps you to search for, organize, and manage your documents. If you are unfamiliar with Adobe Bridge, click the Folders tab in the upper-left corner of the workspace to navigate from one folder to another. An image of a skier appears. The completed lesson file. As you can see by investigating the Layers panel for this image, many of the new features in this lesson relate to new and exciting vector capabilities.

Experimenting with new Vector capabilities In this part of the lesson, you will learn to append custom vector shapes, apply a pattern to them, and adjust the stroke and fill.

If you do not already have the contents of the ps01lessons folder open, click the Favorites tab in the upper-left of the Bridge workspace, and then choose Desktop. Locate the ps01lessons that you copied from your DVD to the Desktop. Using the Save In drop-down menu, navigate to the ps01lessons folder.

Then click Save. When you release the mouse, notice that a Rectangle 1 vector layer has been added in the Layers panel. You will now fill this rectangle with a pattern by taking advantage of some of the new vector features that have been added to Photoshop CS6. Click and drag to create a large rectangle across the right side of the image.

In this section, you will learn how to fill a vector shape with a pattern. Select Grey Granite. The shape is filled with the pattern. If you do not see the options for the vector layer, you may have inadvertently selected another tool. The Vector options appear only when you have selected a vector shape tool, such as the Rectangle tool. Your Options bar reflects the selection of this tool. You gain access to a few default shapes when you select the Custom Shape tool. You can also append additional custom shapes to add more to your collection as you will see in the following steps.

Select the hidden Custom Shape tool. Appending keeps the default shapes and adds the Nature shapes to the bottom of the list. Additional shapes are now added to your list.

Select the nature collection of shapes, and then select Append. Select the Snowflake 1 shape. If Subtract Front Shape is not available, make sure that you still have the Rectangle 1 vector layer selected in the Layers panel. Click and drag to create a large snowflake shape from the center.

Continue dragging until the snowflake is almost as large as the square.

The shape is subtracted from the Rectangle shape. Create a large snowflake shape that subtracts from the Rectangle shape. You can use selection and transform tools to resize a vector shape, but it will be easier to practice creating the shape by starting over again.

Once you are finished experimenting with moving the snowflake, position it back in the center. Adding a mask allows you to fade the shape into the rest of the ski image. Make sure that Rectangle 1 is still the active layer in the Layers panel, and then select the Add layer mask button at the bottom of the Layers panel.

Visually, nothing happens to the image, but a mask appears to the right of the Vector layer thumbnail. Select the Gradient tool from the Tools panel and click and drag from the right side of the snowflake toward the center. A gradient appears, but only on the mask. Layer masks allow you to cover-up parts of your image and make them transparent. Notice that the snowflake does not appear where the gradient is black, and that it appears where the gradient is white. Using the gradient, you have faded the snowflake into transparency.

If you are not satisfied with the gradient that you created, you can click and drag as many times as you want in different directions until you find one that you like. Click and drag to create a gradient mask. The Erodible tip allows you to scribble, draw, and wear out your brush tip much like a pencil or piece of chalk.

The Airbrush tip offers extra controls and settings that allow the brush to act more like a real airbrush. In this example, you will use one of the new Airbrush tips to make snow blow off the skier. Airbrushing is a painting technique that uses a stream of air to apply the paint to a surface.

This opens the New Layer dialog box so that you can immediately name the layer. Once the brush is selected, you see that options specific to the selected brush tip appear at the bottom of the Brushes panel. You can experiment with the settings and see a preview of your brush stroke.

Use it to set the Airbrush tip hardness. Use it to set the distortion of the airbrush. Use it to set the granularity particles of the brush tip. Spatter Size: Use it to set the airbrush spatter size. Spatter Amount: Use it to set the spatter amount. Use it to adjust the space between brush applications.

Select the 80 Airbrush tip and experiment with its settings. You can use any color. Experiment with different settings to see how the changes affect the brush stroke in the image area. You can repeat this step any time you want to paint again.

Click the Enable airbrush-style build-up effects. If you hold the mouse button on one place, this feature spreads the paint much like an actual airbrush.

Set flow and build-up options in the Options bar. Saving the new Brush You can save your own customized brushes by following these steps. The Brush Name dialog box appears.

Your saved brush appears there. Keep it open for the next part of this lesson. If a Photoshop options dialog box appears, click OK. By clicking the image area, you can enter the size of the shape without first creating it. The Create Custom Shape dialog box appears. Put in exact values for your new custom shape. The shape is created and a new Vector layer called Shape 1 has been added in the Layers panel. A new vector layer is added. Change the Fill to No Color. Selecting a shape stroke type using the Stroke dialog box.

Change the following: Select Center from the Align drop-down menu. Make sure Round is selected for both the Caps and Corners. Make sure the Dashed Line checkbox is checked and enter the first four values at 2. Change the stroke options and save it as a preset. Notice that a double cursor appears.

No exact location is necessary. The image with the four cloned snowflakes. This selects all four layers. Notice that your layers might have slightly different names.

Select all the new layers. Grab a corner point to resize the snowflake down in size; no specific size is necessary. Adding Text layers from another document In this next section, you will add text to the image and then save the text as a style, thus allowing you to reuse the style and keep your text styles consistent. To save time, you will open a.

Select Duplicate Layers from the contextual menu. Duplicate the selected layers to an open file. In the Set the font style drop-down menu, select Bold. Now you will decrease the spacing between each letter by changing the tracking value in the text. Visually, decrease the size until you like the results. Before tracking the text. After tracking the text. Applying a saved paragraph style changes the style of text in an entire paragraph. Applying a saved character style allows you to change just the style of selected text.

You can easily create styles from text that you have already applied different attributes to, as you will do with the text that you just changed. Create a new paragraph style based on your text formatting.

Change the style name. The same text attributes are applied. A plus sign next to the Headline style indicates that there may have been a style manually applied. Click the Clear Overrides button at the bottom of the Paragraph Styles panel to apply only the Headline style attributes to the text.

In this next section, you will make a change to your Headline paragraph style. Choose a light gray from the snow and click OK in both dialog boxes. The style has been updated. If your style does not automatically update, press the Clear Overrides button. Cropping an image In this section you receive a quick overview of the Crop tool and how to use it in Photoshop CS6. Keep in mind that if you have used the Crop tool in previous versions, it has been improved on Photoshop CS6.

Locate the ps01lessons folder that you copied from your DVD to the Desktop. This is a final version of the completed lesson file from the previous exercise.

This converts the Background layer into a layer named Layer 0. Handles appear around the image area. You can now crop using one of three main methods: Since the first two methods are self-explanatory, you will experiment with the third method, entering a fixed amount for your crop area. Press the Tab key after you type in the px value.

The crop area immediately changes on your screen to reflect this amount. Enter pixel values into the Crop tool Options bar. You can also see a crop preview in your layers panel. Click and drag to any size, making sure that you have some of the image area cropped, as indicated by the crop overlay that appears on your image. Click and drag to reposition the contents of this layer. Note that the pixels were not actually deleted; you can reposition any of the layers in this image file to show original content.

Keep in mind that the cropped content of layers is saved, but not Background layers. This is why you converted the Background layer into a layer in step 4. Try loading additional custom shapes and experimenting with different fills and strokes. You can also save your own custom shapes. If you have Adobe Illustrator, you can follow these steps to save your vector art from Adobe Illustrator as a custom shape in Adobe Photoshop. The shape is now available in your custom shape drop-down menu.

Subsequently, you can select a preset dashed stroke, or click More Options and then check Dashed Line to create a custom stroke.

You can then enter the width and height values in the Create Custom Shape dialog box. Keep in mind that if you have used the Crop tool in previous versions, it has been improved on Photoshop CS6. Locate the ps01lessons folder that you copied from your DVD to the Desktop. This is a fi nal version of the completed lesson fi le from the previous exercise. This converts the Background layer into a layer named Layer 0.

Select the Crop tool. Handles appear around the image area. You can now crop using one of three main methods: Since the fi rst two methods are self-explanatory, you will experiment with the third method, entering a fi xed amount for your crop area. In the Options bar enter px in the fi rst textbox, and px in the second textbox. Press the Tab key after you type in the px value.

The crop area immediately changes on your screen to reflect this amount. Click and drag from the lower-right corner to see that your crop area remains proportionally correct to the values that you have entered. You can also see a crop preview in your layers panel. Click and drag to any size, making sure that you have some of the image area cropped, as indicated by the crop overlay that appears on your image.

Click and drag to reposition the contents of this layer. Note that the pixels were not actually deleted; you can reposition any of the layers in this image fi le to show original content.

Keep in mind that the cropped content of layers is saved, but not Background layers. This is why you converted the Background layer into a layer in step 4. Self study There are many more vector capabilities that you can take advantage of in Adobe Photoshop CS6. Try loading additional custom shapes and experimenting with different fi lls and strokes. You can also save your own custom shapes. If you have Adobe Illustrator, you can follow these steps to save your vector art from Adobe Illustrator as a custom shape in Adobe Photoshop.

The shape is now available in your custom shape drop-down menu. Subsequently, you can select a preset dashed stroke, or click More Options and then check Dashed Line to create a custom stroke. You can create a shape does not work with the Line tool in an exact size by selecting the tool and then clicking once in the image area. You can then enter the width and height values in the Create Custom Shape dialog box. You can then designate another open fi le as the destination, or choose New to create a new fi le with the layers already included.

A Paragraph style changes the attributes of text in an entire paragraph. A Character style allows you to change just the attributes of the selected text. Lesson 1, Exploring Photoshop CS6.

You will also discover how to open a document using Adobe Bridge, how to use the Tools panel, and how to easily navigate through images. Starting up Adobe Photoshop is an image-editing program that can open an image captured by a scanner or digital camera, or downloaded from the Web. It can also open captured video images and vector illustrations. In addition, you can create new documents in Photoshop, including vector graphics, which are scalable image fi les for example, the images can be enlarged or reduced in size with no loss of clarity.

Before starting, make sure that your tools and panels are consistent by resetting your preferences. You will work with several fi les from the ps02lessons folder in this lesson.

See Lesson 2 in action! Even though you will be instructed to use Adobe Bridge throughout the lessons in this book, you can also choose to use Mini Bridge.

Click on Favorites and select your User Name from the drop-down menu in the navigation pod on the left side of Mini Bridge. You now see personal folders that you can navigate to, such as Desktop, Documents, and Pictures. Double-click on Desktop to see the folders on your desktop appear in the Navigation pod, including the pslessons folder that you downloaded or dragged to the desktop from the DVD. Double-click the pslessons folder to reveal the contents, and then click ps02lessons.

The Mini Bridge now displays three images of an antique car in the folder. An image of an antique car appears. This is the fi nished project. You may keep it open as you work or close it once you have examined the fi le. As you practice with the fi les throughout this book, you will find that you are instructed to save a work fi le immediately after opening the original fi le.

Open the fi le named ps Navigate to the ps02lessons folder. Click Save. There are four main groups of tools, separated by functionality on the Tools panel: At the bottom of the Tools panel you find Set foreground color and Set background color, as well as Quick Mask. Selection, cropping, and measuring tools. Retouching and painting tools.

Drawing and type tools. Navigation tools. You can create a floating Tools panel by clicking on the gray title bar at the top of the Tools panel and then dragging it to a new location. You can dock it again by dragging it back to the left side of the workspace; release when you see the blue vertical bar appear. Lesson 2, Getting to Know the Workspace.

The Tools panel is in a space-saving, one-column format. Click on the double arrows in the gray title bar area above the Tools panel to bring the Tools panel into the two-column view. Click on the double arrows again to bring the Tools panel back to the default, single-column view. Keep the Tools panel set to whichever format works best for you. Accessing tools and their options With the selection of most tools comes the opportunity to change options. In this exercise, you will have the opportunity to use the new-and-improved Brush tool and change its options to become even more powerful.

Look in the Options bar to see a variety of options you can change. Most tools have additional options available in the Options bar at the top of the workspace. Note that by default, your brush is loaded with black paint. The paint color is indicated at the bottom of your Tools panel in the Foreground and Background color swatches. If you have not reset preferences, you might have a different color in your foreground. Using the Color Picker, you are able to select a blue color that you will use to brighten up the sky.

In the Color Picker, click once on the section of the Color Slider that contains blue hues, and then choose a bright blue color from the large Color Pane. Keep in mind that, depending upon the destination of your image, you might not be able to achieve the same color of blue that you see in the screen.

Click OK. Click once in the blue section of the Color Slider, and then choose a bright blue color from the Color Pane. Now you will change some of the Brush tool options in the Options bar at the top of the workspace. Click the Brush Preset Picker to see your options for size and hardness.

There are several options that you can change; for now you will focus on two. Click and drag the size slider, which controls the size of the brush, to the right until you reach approximately px. This is now a large soft brush that will blend well at the edges of the strokes In the next step, you will paint and then undo it.

This is to help you understand the concept of blending and how it can make a difference when you paint. Click and drag anywhere in the image one time to create a brush stroke across your image. Note that you have created a large opaque streak. Now click and hold the Painting Mode drop-down menu; you see a list of options that allow you to change how your paint interacts with the image underneath.

Select Color from the bottom of the list. Click the arrow to the right of the Opacity option to see the slider. You see that the result is quite different and you are brightening the sky. Keep this fi le open for the next part of this lesson. Using panels Much of the functionality in Photoshop resides in the panels, so you will learn to navigate them and quickly find the ones you need. In this section, you will learn how to resize, expand, and convert panels to icons and then back to panels again.

Putting the panel system to use Photoshop has a default setting for all the panels: There are many panels, and not all of them are needed for all projects. This is the reason Photoshop has defined workspaces, which can help you streamline your workflow.

At this point, you have just reset the Essentials workspace.

To open panels that are not visible, choose the Window menu. If there is a check mark to the left of the panel listed, it means that the panel is already open.

Photoshop CS6 can determine whether a panel is hidden behind another; panels that are hidden this way will not be marked as open, so you can select it in the Window menu to bring the hidden panel forward.

Click the color called Pure Red Orange in the Swatches panel. Notice that when you cross over a color, a Tooltip appears. You can also select Small List from the Swatches panel menu in the upper-right corner.

With the Brush tool selected, start painting in the upper-left of the image, adding orange to the sky. Keep in mind that by masking, or selecting parts of the image, you can have much more control over where you paint in an image.

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Choosing other panels You will now select another panel, the History panel. The History panel allows you to undo and redo steps, as well as save versions of your image while you work. In this exercise, you will use the History panel to undo and redo steps.

Click the History panel icon that is visible in the Essentials workspace. Each row in the History panel represents a history state or step. You can click back on earlier states to undo steps that you have taken, or redo by clicking the grayedout history state. Keep in mind that if you step back in history and then complete a new step, all the gray history states disappear. Click back on the various history states to see how your steps are undone. Click forward again to see your steps redone. Expanding and collapsing your panels To better manage your space, you can collapse and expand your panels.

You can do this automatically with a preconfigured workspace, or you can choose to expand only the panels you want to see.

You might fi nd that you need to reset your workspace to bring it back to its original configuration. Collapse groups of panels by double-clicking the dark gray bar title bar at the top of the panels. Double-click the dark gray bar again to expand them. If the History panel is no longer open, click the icon for the History panel. Click the double-arrow in the upper-right to collapse that panel back to an icon. Customizing your panels A panel group is made up of two or more panels that are stacked on top of each other.

To view the other panels in a group, select the name on the tab of the panel. You will now learn to organize your panels according to your preferences. If the Swatches panel is not forward, select the tab that reads Swatches; the Swatches tab is brought forward. Rearranging panels can help you keep frequently used panels together in one area.

Click the tab area at the top of the Swatches panel and drag it over the Color panel. As soon as you see an outline around the Color panel, release the mouse. You have now made a panel group. Saving a workspace is a good idea if you have production processes that often use the same panels.

Saving workspaces is also helpful if you are in a situation where multiple users are sharing Photoshop on one computer. Hidden tools Some of the tools in the Tools panel display a small triangle at the bottom-right corner; this indicates that there are additional tools hidden under the tool. Select the Mixer Brush tool and release. The Color Mixer tool is now the visible tool, and the options in the Options bar have been changed. The Mixer Brush simulates realistic painting techniques, such as mixing colors on the canvas, combining colors on a brush, or varying paint wetness across a stroke.

You will now change the foreground color by selecting Set the foreground color in the Tools panel. Position your cursor on the Color Slider hue to the right of the Color Pane and click and drag it up until shades of orange appear in the Color Pane.

Click once in the Color Pane to select an orange color. Any orange color will do for this exercise, but you can also type a value into the text fields for a more accurate selection. In this example, a color with the RGB value of R: Click on the Brush Preset picker button in the Options bar and set the following attributes for the Mixer Brush tool. Leave all other settings at their defaults. There are many options for the Mixer Brush, but for this example, you will use a preset that will adjust all the settings to give you a smooth blended result in your image.

Click once on Useful mixer brush combinations drop-down menu and select the Moist, Light Mix preset. This is the keyboard shortcut for Fit on Screen, and it assures that you see the entire image area. With the Mixer Brush tool still selected, start painting in the upper-left area of your image to create a shade of orange blending in from the corner. Repeat this for all four corners in the image. Changing the zoom level allows you to select and paint accurately and helps you see details that you might otherwise have overlooked.

The zoom function has a range from a single pixel up to a percent enlargement, which gives you a lot of flexibility in terms of viewing your images. This is the keyboard shortcut for the Zoom In command that you accessed previously from the View menu.

Now you will fit the entire image on the screen. Using the Zoom tool When you use the Zoom tool , each click increases the view size to the next preset percentage, and centers the display of the image around the location in the image that you clicked on. By holding the Alt Windows or Option Mac OS key down with the Zoom tool selected , you can zoom out of an image, decreasing the percentage and making the image view smaller.

The magnifying glass cursor is empty when the image has reached either its maximum magnification level of 3, percent or the minimum size of one pixel. Select the Zoom tool, and click two times on the license plate to zoom in.

You can also use key modifiers to change the behavior of the Zoom tool. You can accurately zoom into the exact region of an image by clicking and dragging a marquee around that area in your image. To do this, you must disable a new Zoom tool option. The Scrubby Zoom feature allows you to click and drag to zoom immediately. In this example, you need a more predictable zoom area. You are creating a rectangular marquee selection around the front of the car. Once you release the mouse, the area that was included in the marquee is now enlarged to fi ll the document window.

Double-click the Zoom tool in the Tools panel to return to a percent view. Because the Zoom tool is used so often, it would be tiresome to continually have to change from the Zoom tool back to the tool you were using. Read on to see how you can activate the Zoom tool at any time without deselecting your current tool.

Note that on the Mac OS you must hold down spacebar before the Command key, otherwise you trigger Spotlight; the Move tool is temporarily converted into the Zoom In tool. Note that although you have changed the zoom level, the Move tool is still active. Using the Hand tool The Hand tool allows you to move or pan around the document. It is a lot like pushing a piece of paper around on your desk. Select the Hand tool , then click and drag to the right to push the picture to the right.

Notice that when the Hand tool is active, four view buttons appear in the Options bar at the top of the work area that allow you to change your current view to Actual Pixels, Fit Screen, Fill Screen, and Print Size. Select the Zoom tool and hold the spacebar.

Notice that the cursor turns into the Hand tool. Click and drag left to view the front of the car again. By holding down the spacebar, you can access the Hand tool without deselecting the current tool. Double-click the Hand tool in the Tools panel to fit the entire image on your screen.

Tabbed windows In Photoshop, you have control over how your windows appear in the workspace. You can work with floating image windows, or choose to tab your windows across the top of the workspace.

In this section, you find out how to use the new tabbed workspace. In the Navigation pod, double-click on the image named ps The image is displayed as a separate tab within Photoshop, allowing you to click on the tab to switch between active images.

Click on the ps The image second window is now floating. Click the title bar of the floating window and drag upward until your cursor is next to the tab of the other image. When you see a blue bar appear, release the mouse button. The image is now back to being a tabbed window. You can stop a window from tabbing accidently by holding down the Ctrl Windows or Command Mac OS key while dragging the floating window.

You have a choice of three screen modes in which to work. Most users start and stay in the default—Standard Screen mode—unless they accidentally end up in another. Screen modes control how much space your current image occupies on your screen, and whether you can see other Photoshop documents as well.

The Standard Screen mode is the default screen mode when you open Photoshop for the first time. It displays an image on a neutral gray background for easy and accurate viewing of color without distractions, and also provides a flexible work area for dealing with panels.

Press the Tab key; the Tools panel and other panels disappear, creating much more workspace. Press the Tab key again to bring the Tools panel and other panels back. Both the Tools panel and the panel docking area should now be visible. As you position your cursor over various tools, you see a letter to the right of the tool name in the tooltip. This letter is the keyboard shortcut that you can use to access that tool. You could, in fact, work with the Tools panel closed and still have access to all the tools via your keyboard.

You will hide the panels once more so that you can take advantage of a hidden feature in Photoshop CS6. Press the Tab key to hide the panels. Then position your cursor over the thin gray strip where the Tools panel had been, and pause.

The Tools panel reappears. Note that the Tools panel appears only while your cursor is in the Tools panel area, and it disappears if you move your cursor out of that area. Try this with the panel docking area to the right of the screen, and watch as that also appears and disappears as your cursor moves over the gray border off to the right.

By changing the screen modes, you can locate over-extended anchor points and select more accurately up to the edge of your image. Changing modes can also help you present your image to clients in a clean workspace.

This view surrounds the image out to the edge of the work area with a neutral gray even behind the docking area and displays only one image at a time, without tabs, and centered within the work area. You can access additional open images by choosing the image name from the bottom of the Window menu. Notice that the gray background area pasteboard now extends to fi ll your entire screen, and your image is centered within that area.

One of the benefits of working in this mode is that it provides more area when working on images. This is Full Screen mode. A favorite with multimedia users, it allows you to show others your document full-screen with no distracting screen elements. All menus and panels are hidden automatically in this mode; however, they are still accessible by hovering the cursor over the area where the panels normally reside.

The panels temporarily reappear for easy access. If you do not see your the Tools panels you can press Tab. You can doubleclick on ps Explore the different views that Photoshop provides by choosing various image arrangements. Click on the tabs of various panels and practice clicking and dragging panels from one group to another. Use the Window menu to open the Info, Histogram, and Layers panels, and then save a new workspace called Color Correction.

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Take a look at some of the pre-built workspaces Photoshop has already provided for you. They will change the panel locations, and some will highlight things in the menu that are relevant to each workspace. For instance, by selecting New in CS6, you see the new panels and new features highlighted in the menus.

The Full Screen mode displays a document window on a black background and hides all interface elements from view. When you leave one panel to select another, the initial panel returns to its original location in the docking area.

In Adobe Bridge, you can manage and organize your files, utilize and modify XMP metadata for faster searches, and quickly preview files before opening them. You will work with several fi les from the ps03lessons folder in this lesson. See Lesson 3 in action! What is Adobe Bridge? Adobe Bridge helps you locate, organize, and browse the documents you need to create print, web, video, and audio content.

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This lesson covers the functionality of the complete Bridge application, not the Mini Bridge that is available as a panel in your Photoshop workspace. You can use Bridge to access documents such as images, text fi les, and even non-Adobe documents, such as Microsoft Word or Excel fi les. Using Adobe Bridge, you can also organize and manage images, videos, and audio fi les, as well as preview, search, and sort your fi les without opening them in their native applications.

With Bridge, you can easily locate fi les using the Filters panel and import images from your digital camera right into a viewing area that allows you to quickly rename and preview your fi les. This is why the recommended workflow throughout this book includes opening and saving fi les in Adobe Bridge. Reading through this lesson will help you to feel more comfortable with Adobe Bridge, and will also make you aware of some of the more advanced features that are available to you for your own projects.

Adobe Bridge contains additional features when installed as part of one of the Creative Suites. The tools and features demonstrated in this lesson are available in both the single-product install and the Suite install, unless otherwise noted. If you receive a dialog box asking if you want Adobe Bridge to launch at start-up, select Yes. Click on the Favorites panel to make sure it is forward. Click on Desktop listed in the Folders panel.

You see the ps03lessons folder that you downloaded to your hard drive. Double-click on the ps03lessons folder and notice that the contents of that folder are displayed in the Content panel, in the center of the Adobe Bridge window.

You can also navigate by clicking on folders listed in the Path bar that is located in the upperleft corner of the content window. You can view folder contents by double-clicking on a folder, or by selecting the folder in the Path bar.

In this folder, you see a variety of fi le types, including Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Acrobat, and video fi les. These fi les came from istockphoto. You can navigate through your navigation history by clicking on the Go back and Go forward arrows in the upper-left corner of the window.

Use the handy Reveal recent fi le or go to Reveal recent fi le or go to recent folder drop-down menu to fi nd folders and fi les that you recently opened.

Note that there are also helpful navigational tools that allow you to quickly return to Photoshop, load photos from a camera, and fl ip your images. Go back. Go forward. Go to parent or Favorites. Reveal recent file or go to recent folder. Return to Adobe Photoshop. Get Photos From Camera. Camera Raw. Path bar. Using folders in Adobe Bridge Adobe Bridge is used for more than just navigating your fi le system.

Bridge is also used to manage and organize folders and fi les. Click on the tab of the Favorites panel in the upper-left corner of the Bridge window to make sure it is still forward. Then click on the arrow to the left of Desktop so that it turns downward and reveals its contents.

If you are on the Mac OS, you can simply click on Desktop to reveal the contents. Click on Computer to reveal its contents in the center pane of the Bridge window.

Continue to double-click on items, or click on the arrows to the left of the folder names in the Folder panel, to reveal their contents. Managing folders Adobe Bridge is a great tool for organizing folders and files. It is a simple matter of dragging and dropping to reorder items on your computer. You can create folders, move folders, move files from one folder to another, and copy files and folders to other locations; any organizing task that can be performed on the computer can also be performed in Adobe Bridge.

This is a great way to help keep volumes of images organized for easy accessibility, as well as easy searching. One advantage of using Adobe Bridge for these tasks is that you have bigger and better previews of images, PDF files, and movies, with much more information about those files at your fingertips. Click on ps03lessons to view its contents. Click on the Create a New Folder icon in the upper-right corner of the Bridge window to create a new untitled folder inside the ps03lessons folder.

Type the name Graphics. You can use Adobe Bridge to organize images. Since you are able to see a preview of each fi le, you can more easily rename them, as well as relocate them to more appropriate locations in your directory system. In the next step, you will move fi les from one folder to the new Graphics folder you have just created. Both images are selected. Click and drag the selected images to the Graphics folder. When the folder becomes highlighted, release the mouse.

The fi les have now been moved into that folder. Double-click on the Graphics folder to view its contents. Click on ps03lessons in the fi le path bar at the top to return to the ps03lessons folder content.

Making a Favorite As you work in Photoshop, you will fi nd that you frequently access the same folders. One of the many great features in Bridge is that you can designate a frequently used folder as a Favorite, allowing you to quickly and easily access it from the Favorites panel. This is extremely helpful, especially if the folders that you are frequently accessing are stored deep in your fi le hierarchy.

Select the Favorites panel in the upper-left corner of the Bridge window to bring it to the front. In the list of Favorites, click on Desktop. Double-click on the ps03lessons folder to see the skateboarding images. Place your cursor over the Graphics folder in the center pane Content , and click and drag the Graphics folder until you see a horizontal line appear in the Favorites panel.

Be careful not to drag this folder into a folder highlighted with a blue box in the Favorites panel. When a cursor with a plus sign appears, release the mouse. On the Mac OS you will see a circle with a plus sign. The folder is now listed as a Favorite.

Click on the Graphics folder shown in the Favorites panel to view its contents. Note that creating a Favorite simply creates a shortcut for quick access to a folder; it does not copy the folder and its contents.

When you are fi nished looking inside the Graphics folder, press the Go back arrow to return to the ps03lessons folder. If your Favorite is created from a folder on an external hard drive or server, you will need to have the hard drive or server mounted in order to access it. Creating and locating metadata Metadata is information that can be stored with images. This information travels with the fi le, and makes it easy to search for and identify the fi le.

In this section, you are going to fi nd out how to locate and create metadata. Make sure that you are viewing the contents of the ps03lessons folder in the center pane of Adobe Bridge. If not, navigate to that folder now. This ensures that you are in the Essentials view and that all the default panels for Adobe Bridge are visible. Alternatively, you can click Essentials in the Application bar at the top-right of the Bridge workspace. You may need to maximize your Bridge window after you reset the workspace.

Note that if you click on the arrow to the right of the workspace presets, you can choose other workspaces, and even save your own custom workspace. If the Metadata panel is not visible, click on the Metadata panel tab. In this panel, you see the image data that is stored with the fi le. Take a few moments to scroll through the data and view the information that was imported from the digital camera which was used to take the photo.

Click and drag the bar to the left of the Metadata panel farther to the left if you need to open up the window. With XMP, desktop applications and back-end publishing systems gain a common method for capturing and sharing, valuable metadata.

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On the right side of this list, notice a series of pencil icons. The pencil icons indicate that you can enter information in these fields. You will add additional information. If you are not able to edit or add metadata information to a file, it may be locked. Scroll down until you can see Description Writer, and click on the pencil next to it. All editable fields are highlighted, and a cursor appears in the Description Writer field. Scroll up to locate the Description text field.

Click on the Pencil icon to the right and type Skateboarder catching air, to add a description for the image. Using keywords Keywords can reduce the amount of time it takes to find an image on a computer, by using logical words to help users locate images more quickly. Click on the Keywords tab, which appears behind the Metadata panel. A list of commonly used keywords appears. Click on the New Keyword button at the bottom of the Keywords panel. Check the empty checkbox to the left of the Skateboarder keyword.

This adds the Skateboarder keyword to the selected image. Check the empty checkbox to the left of the Male keyword. Select the Skateboarder keyword, and then click on the New Keyword button at the bottom of the Keywords panel; a blank text field appears.

Then check the checkbox next to Sunset to assign the keyword to this image. Make sure the Orange checkbox remains checked. Once it is entered in the File Info dialog box, the information is visible in Adobe Bridge. Creating a Metadata Template Once you have added metadata to an image, you can easily apply it to more by creating a metadata template. In the Template Name text field at the top , type Sunset Skateboarders.

In the Create Metadata Template window, you can choose the information that you want to build into a template. In this exercise, we will choose information that already exists in the selected fi le, but if you wanted to, you could add or edit information at this point. Check the Checkboxes to the left of the following categories; Creator, Creator: City, Creator: You have just saved a template. Next, you will apply it to the other two sunset images in this folder. Note that you can also choose Replace Metadata if you want to eliminate existing metadata.

The same metadata has now been applied to all the images at once. Not only is it very visual, but important data stored with the fi les also makes it easier to locate the correct fi le.

Sometimes you will find that double-clicking on a file opens it in a different application than expected. Searching for files using Adobe Bridge Find the fi les that you want quickly and easily by using the Search tools built directly into Adobe Bridge, and taking advantage of the Filter panel.

In this example, you have a limited number of fi les to search within, but you will have the opportunity to see how helpful these search features can be. Using the Find dialog box in Adobe Bridge, you can narrow your criteria down to make it easy to fi nd your fi les when needed. The Find dialog box appears.

Select Keywords from the Criteria drop-down menu, and type Skateboarder into the third text field replacing Enter Text. Because you are looking within the active folder only, you get a result immediately. Clear the search by pressing the X icon to the right of the New Search icon at the top of the results pane. Using the Filter panel, you can look at attributes such as fi le type, keywords, and date created or modified, in order to narrow down the fi les that appear in the content window of Adobe Bridge.

Make sure that you are still viewing the content of the ps03lessons folder. Notice that the Filter panel collects the information from the active folder, indicating the keywords that are being used, as well as modification dates and more. Click to turn down the arrow next to Keywords in the Filter panel, and select Skateboarder from the list to see that only images with the Skateboarder keyword applied are visible.

Click on Skateboarder again to deselect it and view all the images. Click the Clear fi lter button in the lower-right of the Filter panel to turn off any fi lters.

Experiment with investigating fi le types as well. Only fi le types that exist in the selected folder appear in the list. If you are looking for an Adobe Illustrator fi le, you may see that there are none located in this folder, but you will see a QuickTime video fi le that you can select and preview right in Adobe Bridge. Again, click the Clear fi lter button in the lower-right of the Filter panel to turn off any fi lters. A Collection allows you to take images from multiple locations and access them in one central location.

Understand that Adobe Bridge essentially creates a shortcut or alias to your fi les and does not physically relocate them or copy them to a different location. The Collections panel comes forward. Click the gray area in the content pane to make sure that nothing is selected, and then click the New Collection button in the lower-right of the Collections panel.

Type Redmond Skateboarding into the new collection text field. Press Return or Enter to confi rm your new collection.

Navigate back to the ps03lessons folder, and then take two random skateboarding images and drag them to the Redmond Skateboarding collection. In this example, the two images of the girl skateboarding were selected. Click on the Redmond Skateboarding collection folder to see that even though you can easily access the fi les that you added to the collection, the fi les remain intact in their original location.

Automation tools in Adobe Bridge Adobe Bridge provides many tools to help you automate tasks. In this section, you will learn how to access and take advantage of some of these features. Batch renaming your files You may have noticed that in the ps03lessons fi le there are many fi les that contain iStock in the fi lename. These images were downloaded from iStockphoto. Press the Go back arrow in the upper-left of the Adobe Bridge window to go back to the ps03lessons folder.

All the images are selected. The Batch Rename dialog box appears. In this instance we want a simple uncomplicated name. If you look in the Preview section at the bottom of the Batch Rename dialog box, you can see that the Current fi lename and New fi lename are pretty long strings of text and numbers.

You will simplify this by eliminating some of text from the fi lenames. In the New Filenames section, type Skateboard in the text field to the right of default criteria of Text. Confi rm that the sequence number is starting at 1. You can start it anywhere if you are adding additional images to a folder later. If there is any other criteria, click on the Minus sign button Remove this text from the fi le names to remove them. The New fi lename in the Preview section becomes significantly shorter.

If you look in the Preview section at the bottom of the dialog box, you can see that the new fi lename is a very simple Skateboard Press the Rename button. All the selected fi les automatically have their name changed.

In this example, you will select three images that you want to incorporate into one composited image. Instead of opening all three images and cutting and pasting or dragging them into one fi le, you will use the Load Files into Photoshop layers feature. Make sure that you are still in the ps03lessons folder; select the Skateboard All three images are selected. Select the Tools menu item and then select Photoshop.

Note that there are many tools that you can use in this menu item; for this example, select the Load Files into Photoshop Layers option. A script immediately launches Photoshop if it is not already open and a new layered fi le is created from the selected images.

You should ensure that your selected images are approximately the same pixel dimensions before running this script; otherwise, you may have to make some transformation adjustments in Photoshop. In this example, the images are approximately the same size.

Automated tools for Photoshop: Web Photo Gallery If you want to share images online, you can use the Web Photo Gallery, which creates a web site that features a home page with thumbnail images and gallery pages with full-size images.

You select the images you want to include in the site and Adobe Bridge does the rest, from automatically creating navigation images, like arrows, links, and buttons, to creating Flash fi les. This is a fun feature that you can take advantage of quickly, even if you have no coding experience. If you have coding experience, or if you want to edit the pages further, you can open the pages in Adobe Dreamweaver or any other HTML editor to customize them. You can leave the Graphics folder selected, you will receive a warning that some of the selected fi les are not supported image fi les, but it will not cause any errors.

Click and hold down on the Output drop-down menu located in the upper-right of the Application bar, and choose Output; the workspace changes to reveal an Output panel on the right. If you cannot see all the options in the Output panel, click and drag the vertical bar to the left of the panel to increase its size.

As you can see, there are a lot of options to choose from, including Lightroom Flash Galleries, and Airtight viewers. For this example, you will keep it simple. You can also add photograph captions if you like, as well as text in the About This Gallery text field, to include more information.

In this example, those are left at their defaults. Using the scroll bar to the right of the Site Info section, click and drag to scroll down through the rest of the options. Note that you can add additional contact information, and defi ne colors that you want to use for different objects on the page, including text.

Press the Preview in Browser button that is located in the upper-half of the Output panel; your website is automatically created.

Note that because the Graphics folder and a video are selected, you will get a warning that some of the fi les are not supported image types, Press OK. You may also receive.

An ActiveX warning; instruct the browser to Allow blocked content so your browser can preview your website. Close the browser before you move to the next part of this lesson. Saving or uploading your Web Gallery So now you have an incredible Web Gallery, but what do you do with it? The Web Photo Gallery feature creates an index page, individual gallery pages, and images, and so you need someplace to put them.

You have a couple options available if you click the scroll bar to the right of Site Info and drag down until you see the option under Create Gallery for Gallery Name.

Note that you can choose to save your Gallery to a location on your hard drive, or input the FTP login information directly in Adobe Bridge to upload your file directly to a server.

In this example, you will save the Web Gallery to your ps03lessons folder. Scroll down in the Output panel until you see the Create Gallery section. Click the Browse button to the right of Save Location. Navigate to the ps03lessons folder on your desktop, and click OK. Click on the Save button at the bottom of the Output panel. A dialog box appears, indicating that you have successfully created a Gallery; press OK. You have successfully saved your Web Gallery.

Use Adobe Bridge to navigate and open the contents of the Adobe Web Gallery folder that was created in the ps03lessons folder.

Open the contents to see that your components are neatly organized so that you can open them in your web editor and customize them, or send them to your web site administrator for uploading.

PDF contact sheet By creating a PDF contact sheet, you can assemble a series of images into one fi le for such purposes as client approval and summaries of folders. To make it easy to select just the images you want, click on Essentials to change the Adobe Bridge workspace back to the defaults. If you do not see the contents of the ps03lessons folder in the content window in Bridge, click on Desktop, and then double-click on the ps03lessons folder.

If you stored the lesson fi les elsewhere, use the navigation tools in Bridge to locate your lesson fi les.

In the Document section of the Output panel, choose U. Paper from the Page Preset drop-down menu. Scroll down and notice that you have options for fi nal size, document quality, and even security in the Output panel. You will leave these items at the default and scroll down to the Playback section of this panel. The Playback section allows you to set the initial view of the PDF when it is opened, as well as set the timing and transitions between pages of your PDF.

The Save As dialog box appears. In the Save As dialog box, type contact, and then browse to save the fi le in your ps03lessons folder; press Save. The contact. Changing the view You can work the way you like by adjusting the look and feel of Adobe Bridge.

Changing the view can help you focus on what is important to see in the Content section of the Bridge workspace. Whether you need to focus on content or thumbnails, there is a view that can help you. Before experimenting with the views, make sure that you are in the Essentials workspace by selecting the Essentials button located in the upper-right of the Bridge workspace. Click on the Click to Lock to Thumbnail Grid button in the lower-right corner of the Bridge workspace.

The images are organized into a grid. Now click on the View Content as Details button to see a thumbnail and details about creation date, last modified date, and fi le size. Choose the View Content as List button to see the contents consolidated into a neat list, which you can easily scroll through.

Experiment with changing the size of the thumbnails in the Content panel by using the slider to the left of the preview buttons. Self study As you work with Bridge, create some new Favorites of folders that you frequently use. You might also want to practice removing Favorites: Also, explore creating a PDF slide show when in the Output mode.

Experiment with the Playback options in the Output panel by creating a full-screen presentation of the images in the Content panel of Adobe Bridge. You find metadata information in the Metadata and Keywords panels in the lower-right corner of the Bridge workspace.

Metadata is editable if it has the pencil icon next to it. You will work with several fi les from the ps04lessons folder in this lesson. See Lesson 4 in action! A look at the finished project In this lesson, you will develop a composite using several images, while addressing issues such as resolution, resizing, and choosing the right fi le format.

To see the fi nished document: Using Adobe Bridge, navigate to the pslessons folder on your hard drive and open the ps04lessons folder. Click on the visibility icon to the left of the cow layer to hide the layer.

Click the box where the visibility icon used to be to make the layer visible again. Layers allow you to combine different elements into a single fi le while retaining the ability to move and modify each layer independently of the others. Opening an existing document Now you will assemble all the images that are part of the final combined image. From the ps04lessons folder, select the fi le named ps All the selected images open in Adobe Photoshop. If you receive an Embedded Profile Mismatch warning when opening the images, you may have forgotten to reset your preferences using the instructions on page 3.

Understanding document settings In this section, you will move images from one fi le to another to create your mock-up. Moving layers between documents that have different resolutions may create unexpected results, such as causing the images to appear out of proportion. Click on the tab of the image of the barn, ps Press Alt Windows or Option Mac OS and click the fi le information area in the status bar, located in the lower-left corner of the document window.

If the picture of the rooster, ps The Image Size dialog box appears. The Image Size dialog box is divided into two main areas: Pixel Dimensions and Document Size. Pixel Dimensions shows the number of pixels that make up the image. Document Size shows the resolution information, as well as the actual physical size of the image. The most important factors for size and resolution of web images are the pixel dimensions and the pixels per inch ppi.

If you are designing content for the Web, you should reference the top Pixel Dimensions section of the Image Size dialog box.

As a print designer, you should reference the bottom Document Size section of the Image Size dialog box. The image size of the rooster is pixels by pixels. At this size, the rooster is taller than the barn, which would be apparent when you combine the two fi les. Make sure that the Resample Image and Constrain Proportions checkboxes are both selected.

In the Image Size dialog box, type pixels for height in the Pixel Dimensions portion at the top half of the dialog box. Press OK to apply the transformation and close the Image Size dialog box.

If necessary, click the tab of the rooster image, ps You can have many documents open at once in Photoshop, but only one of them is active at any given time. This creates a selection marquee around the outside edge of the image. Select the tab of the barn picture, ps The rooster appears on top of the barn, and the background surrounding the rooster blocks part of the image. Both these items will be addressed in future steps in this lesson.

Select the tab of the rooster image, ps Do not save any changes. The Arrange features allow you to determine how windows are displayed on your monitor. The Tile features allow you to see all the open images.

Select the Move tool , and then select the picture of the cow, which is the ps Click and drag the cow image over to the barn image.

When your cursor is positioned over the picture of the barn, release your mouse. The cow picture is placed into the barn picture on a new layer. Like using the Copy and Paste command, you can use the Move tool to copy images from one document to another.

You do not have to position images beside each other to move them from one image file to another. You can also drag and drop an image to the document tab of another image, and then drag down into the image area. Select the tab of ps Do not save any changes to the fi le. This fits the entire image into your document window.Scroll down in the Brushes panel to select the Airbrush tip labeled This book covers both versions of Photoshop CS6.

Continue to double-click on items, or click on the arrows to the left of the folder names in the Folder panel, to reveal their contents. In the list of Favorites, click on Desktop. Using the Hand tool, click and drag the window to the right to reveal the content positioned on the left side of the image. Register your book at www. Pixel Dimensions shows the number of pixels that make up the image.

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